Connect with us

Business

Blows exchanged as man finds wife in bed with businessman ▷ Kenya News

Published

on

Loading...

A businessman from Ukambani identified as Kimeu escaped death by a whisker after he was cornered while ‘drinking water from his neighbour’s cistern’.

The husband of the woman he was munching, landed on him in unprecedented, furry filled assault-style.

He said he had for long been hunting for the man that he claimed ‘has made his bae lose interest in him’.

The suspect would arrive at the woman’s house after 10pm while her hubby was away. He works with an NGO within Ukambani.

Throughout this time, there were whispers that the two were having a good time though they tried to keep it secret.

After unsuccessfully trying to ambush the duo, the aggrieved husband sought the services of native doctor Mwikali Kilonzo to help burst them.

Days later, while in the city, he received several calls from neighbours informing him that his wife and the stranger were stuck while doing the unthinkable on their matrimonial bed.

He swiftly set off to his home and it took him four hours to arrive.

“I thought this was just hearsay, I shouldn’t have trusted you in the first place, even after giving you everything you wanted…you have the courage to bring another man in my house?” The NGO man fumed as he descended on them.

He rained kicks and blows on the young man in rapid succession as the ‘thief’ pleaded for sympathy.

The fight was quelled after the security personnel from the nearby police camp intervened.

The show was in no way different from the several other instances of cheating spouses ending up glued together during adulterous missions.

The two were later separated from agony and the man has since summoned his in-laws to discuss the matter.

Apart from netting cheating partners and bring peace in troubled homes, herbalist Mwikali Kilonzo has unique means to influence promotion at work and can spin court cases.

Additionally, she has powerful medicine that can cushion homes from spiritual and physical attacks. She is able to paralyse thieves and recover stolen items.

Contact her on 0722901790 and find a solution for your problem.

She is available in Mbitini Kitui county, Bungoma Town, Kitale and Kenyatta Market in Nairobi.

Loading...

Why Kenyan men are travelling long distance to meet this woman | Tuko TV.

Subscribe to watch new videos

{Sponsored}

Comments

comments

Loading...
Continue Reading

Business

Financial tips couples should never ignore : The Standard

Published

on

Loading...

As unromantic as money may sound, it is impossible to avoid talking about it if you hope to be successful as a couple. Your marriage partner can either be the reason for your success or contribute to your failure.

Therefore, you need to ask the right questions before committing to marriage. Discuss everything, and talk about money as often as possible until you achieve a shared vision.
Here are five ways to get on the same page when it comes to your financial future.
1. Be transparent

SEE ALSO :Luck played no role in shaping our business

Cultivate openness and transparency in your financial affairs. Know each other’s current incomes, expenses, debts and liabilities.
Come clean on your student loans, credit card debts, child or spousal support and what you send home for your parents or spend on your siblings.
Secrets not only put a couple at risk of not meeting their family goals, but threaten the survival of the marriage.

For More of This and Other Stories, Grab Your Copy of the Standard Newspaper.  

2. Make plans jointly
Set long-term goals together. Think about your five, 10, 20, 30-year plans and write them down. There’s something powerful about seeing your dreams down on paper.

SEE ALSO :Consistency is key to entrepreneurial success

Set retirement goals. Prioritise and work on a joint budget and share responsibilities. Set money aside for shared objectives – such as education, buying land or investing in shares.
3. Don’t rush into setting up a joint account
You don’t have to combine finances immediately you say ‘I do’. Take the time to learn each other’s spending habits to avoid conflict down the line. To start off, you can maintain separate accounts and open a joint account with clear budget lines and agree on how both of you will contribute to the kitty and how the money will be managed.
To build trust, maintain accurate records, including for expenditure that doesn’t have receipts, such as buying vegetables from the estate Mama Mboga.
Operating a joint account should be a gradual process. If one partner is an impulsive spender or hides certain expenditure, it’s not advisable to operate a joint account as it will only lead to conflict.

SEE ALSO :Why you should invest in stocks

4. Respect each other’s diversity
Do not micromanage each other. Everyone has things they do for themselves that make them happy and boost their self-esteem.
This could be a hobby, buying make-up or clothes, or membership in a club or society. Rather than belittling something your spouse considers important, figure out how to work it into the budget.
You can agree to set aside some cash that each of you can spend as you wish without having to account for it.
5. Hold money dates to nurture team work

Loading...

SEE ALSO :Firms warn Kenyans of fake job alerts

Hold regular money dates to brainstorm, share ideas, discuss your goals and evaluate your financial standing. These meetings are important for a couple’s growth.
You’re either growing together or growing apart, so make a conscious effort to grow together. Joint planning is crucial whether both partners are earning an income or not.


Do not miss out on the latest news. Join the Standard Digital Telegram channel HERE.

MoneyInvestmentDr PesaJobsRetirementCouple GoalsRelationship Goals

Comments

comments

Loading...
Continue Reading

Business

Robust engagement between Kenya & UK expected at London Summit

Published

on

Loading...

Amb. Esipisu said that the summit will provide a forum for the Governments of Kenya and the UK on areas of cooperation/Courtesy

, LONDON, United Kingdom, 18  – The stage is set for robust engagement between Kenyan and UK business people during the forthcoming UK-Africa Investment Summit, the Kenyan High Commissioner to the UK Ambassador Manoah Esipisu has said.

Briefing the press in London ahead of the inaugural conference scheduled for January 20, Amb. Esipisu said Kenya is at the centre of the UK’s engagement with Africa.

“Three billion pounds worth of UK investment is in Kenya while most of our exports outside East Africa come here as well as to destinations such as the US,” Amb. Esipisu pointed out.

He added that the Kenyan diplomatic mission in the UK looks forward to welcoming the Kenyan delegation led by President Uhuru Kenyatta coming to the UK for the summit.

“We do expect robust engagement between Kenyan and UK business people about the areas in which investment is clear,” the High Commissioner assured.

Amb. Esipisu said that the summit will provide an opportunity for a robust discussion between the Governments of Kenya and the UK on areas of cooperation.

Loading...

“As you know, Kenya has always trumpeted trade and investment, and we do expect that these are the areas that they will focus on for the prosperity of the people of Kenya as well as the prosperity of the people of the United Kingdom,” Amb Esipisu outlined.

Highlighting the investment opportunities in Kenya, Principal Secretary for Petroleum Andrew Kamau said Kenya will be looking to pursue mutually beneficial partnerships with UK investors in the production of sufficient renewable energy to support the implementation of Kenya’s Big 4 Agenda.


Comments

comments

Loading...
Continue Reading

Business

IMF reveals Kenya debt could be more than Sh6.2 trillion : The Standard

Published

on

Loading...

Former National Treasury Cabinet Secretary Henry Rotich is once again on the spotlight, after the International Monetary Fund (IMF) accused his team of using technicalities to conceal the true position of the country’s debt.
Falling short of accusing the Treasury mandarins of cooking numbers, IMF called out the Exchequer for blindfolding the public by using different debt-ceilings when calculating the sustainability of the country’s debt.
The muddling up of debt figures has left Kenyans confused on the true financial position of the country. This means that it is not possible to tell whether Kenya is able to meet all its debt obligations.

SEE ALSO :This man messed up a whole country

“While the 2015 Legal Notice sets a maximum debt level of 50 per cent of GDP in NPV (net present value) terms, budget documents instead assess debt to be sustainable — and therefore acceptable — if it is less than 70 per cent of GDP in NPV terms,” reads IMF’s fiscal transparency report released this week.
The law has since been changed, and the ceiling for public debt shifted from being pegged on the national output, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), to a nominal ceiling of Sh9 trillion. IMF joins Central Bank of Kenya (CBK) Governor Patrick Njoroge in accusing former Treasury CS, together with his Principal Secretary Kamau Thugge, of distorting revenue figures.
In a rare bare-knuckle attack on Rotich’s tenure, Njoroge described the Treasury’s budget-making process as “abracadabra”, where revenue numbers were randomly included in the budget books “from thin air”.

For More of This and Other Stories, Grab Your Copy of the Standard Newspaper.  

The Fiscal Transparency Evaluation Update lays bare the financial indiscipline at the Exchequer, which was overseen by Rotich and his Permanent Secretary Kamau Thugge, with the country’s debt surging to Sh6.2 trillion as at December 2019.
Austerity measures

SEE ALSO :CBK boss bemused by Rotich ‘abracadabra’ budget figures

This comes at a time when the Treasury, led by new CS Ukur Yatanni, has aggressively moved to contain its spending in what is aimed at slashing further debt uptake.
Ministries and parastatals have been told that such things as tea, training and conferences will be reduced in far-reaching austerity measures that have also seen the Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) aggressively go after tax cheats.
Kenya’s debt has spiraled to Sh6.2 trillion as at December 2019, and going by IMF’s remarks, the figure could be even higher.
In a new report, IMF has also blasted the Exchequer and the KRA for not making public the tax reliefs it has granted to some taxpayers.
The National Treasury CS has the discretion to grant tax exemptions, a process that the IMF now says has been shrouded in secrecy.

SEE ALSO :Dam contracts reveal heavy cost of delays

When reached for comment, one of KRA’s spokespersons said the issue of tax exemptions did not fall within the tax agency’s mandate. Instead, they directed us to the National Treasury.
National Treasury PS Julius Muia had not responded to our text message by the time of going to press.
Tax expenditures
The IMF has also turned the spotlight on the country’s taxes, accusing the government of not publishing any regular reports that comprehensively discloses estimated revenue losses from tax expenditures.
This means that the public does not get to know how much the country has foregone in tax revenues through tax reliefs and exemptions.

Loading...

SEE ALSO : State push for marine insurance goes adrift

“The Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) produces a report on annual tax exemptions which is submitted to the Auditor General, but it is not published due to concerns over the reliability of the data,” reads the IMF report.
“Current reporting practices on tax arrears do not comply with the constitutional requirement to publish all tax waivers or the PFM Act’s requirement for publishing an annual report on these exemptions and concessions.”
The IMF capacity development mission came to Nairobi between August 6 and August 19, last year, at the request of the National Treasury. The mission also found out that there was no unit responsible for tax policy issues, either at the National Treasury or KRA. This crippled the performance of KRA, which has been missing its targets.
Already, the taxman has missed its half-year target by Sh88.3 billion, netting Sh857.8 billion.
“Capacity would need to be developed in the KRA and the National Treasury, which still has not created a unit responsible for tax policy issues,” says the report.
The IMF and other development partners had previously provided training on calculating tax expenditures, but most of the government officials involved have left, and the capacity in this area is now low.


Do not miss out on the latest news. Join the Standard Digital Telegram channel HERE.

Henry RotichInternational Monetary FundNational TreasuryNational debt

Comments

comments

Loading...
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Loading...
Advertisement
Loading...

Trending