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How the Boma International Hospitality College is changing the hospitality and fine dining training industry : The Standard

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Are you a high school graduate who has a desire to venture into the hospitality business? Are you someone who has always desired to go into the hotel business? You have been searching for the best college to go to for the necessary skills and are on the verge of giving up on your dream? Or are you currently in the hotel business but are looking to sharpen your skills and get internationally recognized school certificates? Here is a college that is looking to help you nurture your talents, ambitions and give you the vital skills to venture in this industry,


The Boma International Hospitality College (BIHC) in partnership with the Business and Hotel Management School (BHMS) in Switzerland are looking to nurture your interest in the hospitality industry and empower your ambitions. They have a developed state of the art study program which is designed to facilitate access to demanding, while rewarding careers.

BIHC, through their Professional Hospitality Development Program, have set out to train and retrain professionals across various departments of the Hospitality Industry through tailor- made programs and short courses. These involve, front office operations, food and beverage service techniques, professional chefs’ course, housekeeping and laundry operations, among others. This program will not only rejuvenate the student by improving their skill- set but also affirm BIHC’s stand as a top national and regional leader in hospitality training.


Students in class at The Boma International Hospitality College.

The curriculum maintains a strong emphasis on Swiss tradition of balancing theories with immediate practical applications within the and most central operating areas. These are, the Food and Beverage and Rooms Division departments at the Boma Hotel Complex which are part of the Applied Hotel Operations module.

This college is fully equipped with all the necessary equipment. Fitted with modern training kitchens, training restaurants and bars and access to all front and back-of – the house facilities of The Boma Hotels. These include Front office, Housekeeping, Spa and Health Club areas. There has been a recent expansion of facilities and introduction of a new e-learning Resource Centre and lecture rooms equipped with the latest audio-visual equipment, labs and a computer center. Alongside all these good things, all students have good access to Internet, Intranet and Campus- wide wireless connection.

Theory can get boring but at BIHC, they don’t just prioritize that since there are obviously practicals for you while you are enrolled there, I mean how else will you know how to cook and be an expert in hospitality if you don’t practice it? However, that’s not all, at the Boma Franchise, the programs include periods of externships at leading international and local hospitality brands, where the students are expected to prove their skills, knowledge and attitudes. This is done under direct monitoring of professionals who ensure to do their very best to provide guidance for the students’ professional benefit. The students, that is You and I… may undertake PAID International Internship programs in the USA, Middle East and the Caribbean as part of their study package.

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BIHC has ingeniously designed their courses to prepare the students for various positions in the industry globally, with Diploma and Certificate courses which have intakes in January, May and September. Alongside these, there are short courses in International Cookery and Pastry which run separately on weekends or weekdays throughout the year.

With all these, you are on your way to being a hospitality expert and a culinary mastermind. Besides, you could even start your own restaurant and put all those good skills to use. However, Charity begins at home, start by showing off your new skills to your family and friends. I believe you will be the chef you have always imagined to be.

Now go forth and make your dreams come true!



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Boma International Hospitality CollegeBusiness and Hotel Management SchoolBIHCBHMS

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Nigeria Offers $268 Million to its Entrepreneurs

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The government of Nigeria has committed to give a $268 million monetary support to local agricultural entrepreneurs and innovators, even as the country seeks to diversify its economy, and stop wholly depending on oil.

According to the country’s vice president, Yemi Osinbajo, the support will be birthed in two phases and sectors. The Central Bank of Nigeria will disburse the first $248 million as loans to small-sale businesses in the agricultural sector. Thereafter, they will use the remaining $20 million to fund young innovators.

Apart from being Africa’s biggest crude oil producer, Nigeria’s economy is a middle-income, mixed economy and emerging market, with expanding manufacturing, financial, service, communications, technology and entertainment sectors. It is ranked as the 27th-largest economy in the world in terms of nominal GDP, and the 22nd-largest in terms of purchasing power parity. 

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See Also:

Nigeria’s Aella Raises KSh1 Billion to Lend to Underbanked

Nigeria Removes VAT on Food

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Kenya Power reports worst performance in 16 years

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PATRICK ALUSHULA

By PATRICK ALUSHULA
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Kenya Power has reported its worst profit in 16 years, turning the spotlight on the push by the utility firm to raise retail tariffs for homes and businesses.

The firm’s net profit plunged 92 percent from Sh3.26 billion to Sh262 million in the year to June — the lowest profit since it returned to profitability in 2004 after posting Sh2.89 billion loss the previous year.

The cost of buying electricity from power generators like KenGen jumped by Sh18 billion during the period, Kenya Power said, blunting the impact of an increase in sales to customers.

Kenya Power has made an application to the regulator for an increase in electricity prices by up to a fifth, saying it is key in reversing its reducing profitability — which has seen its earnings drop for three years in a row.

Finance costs also went up 46.4 percent to Sh10.3 billion due to higher short-term borrowings, the company said.

“This was mainly attributable to increase in non-fuel power purchase costs by Sh18 billion from Sh52.7 billion to Sh70.8 billion following the commissioning of two power plants with a combined generation capacity of 360 megawatts (MW) during the period,” said Kenya Power.

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The shock results saw the firm’s share at the Nairobi Securities Exchange shed 5.3 percent to close trading at Sh2.52 — a level last seen more than a decade ago. The utility firm also last paid a dividend in 2017.

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The company, the main electricity distributor in Kenya, delayed publication of its results last November due to a vacancy at the Auditor -General’s office, which is responsible for auditing State-controlled firms.

The search for the Auditor-General has been delayed after the initial interviews flopped. The results issued yesterday were not audited.

Executives at Kenya Power look set to use the results to pile pressure on the Energy and Petroleum Regulatory Authority (EPRA) — the electricity sector regulator — for higher tariffs.

Kenya Power wants to increase the consumption charge for those consuming less than 100 kilowatts per month to Sh12.50 a unit, up from the current Sh10.

In August 2018, EPRA reduced the retail prices of electricity after an order from President Uhuru Kenyatta in the wake of widespread complaints from domestic customers and small businesses over a costly tariff introduced last July.

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Financial red flags you must address before you turn 40 : The Standard

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After age 40, you really can’t afford to be financially clueless.

Kenyans have a habit of ignoring red flags.

We ignore the blinking red light when the car fuel is running low, we neglect to pay taxes until the very last minute and we often overlook that our date “forgot” to carry their wallet to a date.
But there’s one red flag that’s non-negotiable.
After age 40, you really can’t afford to be financially clueless; so here are money red flags, big and small, you should attend to before then.

SEE ALSO :How to build an emergency fund

1.   Not funding your nest egg
Before years start running by, a plan should be in place for retirement. You may not have a fortune in your fund but aim to at least have a solid foundation by then so that you can grow it in the next decade.
Besides the statutory scheme, the National Social Security Fund (NSSF), you can set up an individual pension plan.

For More of This and Other Stories, Grab Your Copy of the Standard Newspaper.  

“There are also other unorthodox methods like tree planting. Say you have a piece of land somewhere in Embu, if you plant 100 trees at age 40 by age 55 they will have matured and you can sell them around Sh50,000 each. You have a cool Sh5m while still protecting the environment,” says financial trainer, James Maina.
You could also source for information from other plans under the guideline of RBA.

SEE ALSO :How to start a business

2.   Not purchasing a life insurance policy
Shopping and paying for life insurance may not seem very appealing, but if you have people in your life who depend on you financially, or who suffer if you were to pass away unexpectedly, then you absolutely need a life insurance policy.
Choosing term life insurance (one that expires after a number of years) over permanent life insurance (stays in place until one dies) is a good option for many reasons. It is not only a good way to keep premium costs down but also being so young (at 40) you should have a relatively easy time locking in a reasonable premium rate.
3.   Overlooking your personal development
At 40, your papers should be right. Study as far as you can when you are younger so that you are eligible for work promotions. If you want to grow at that job you had all your life, grow your skills.

SEE ALSO :Career blunders we aren’t making in 2020…

“If you use your skills to earn money, you need to advance them to create that trajectory for success. Even in the army, if you are 40 and haven’t been promoted to higher positions, they retire you. This is because you cannot be 50 and your commander is 38,” adds Maina.
4.   Not legitimising your business
Have your business idea clearly outlined. Understand your business, put its growth plan in writing and it should be a registered business with its own account. Create clear strategies to scale it and project that for 10 plus years.
If possible have a professional guide you. This is to avoid legal issues that will bring your business down in future.
Meanwhile, have a fallback plan.

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SEE ALSO :How to raise capital for your start-up

“Don’t fall in love with one business, it can break your heart. For instance, your business is farming and that is where you get your money. But now there is a locust infestation. What is your contingency plan? Try create about five streams of income apart from your day-to-day job,” he adds.
5.    Not Investing
If you already have a fully funded emergency savings account, no high-interest debt and are on track for retirement, then you are free to think about investment. When you invest, your money makes you more money.
Investing doesn’t mean you have to be a landlord, like many Kenyans are prone to thinking. There are many other options like shares, T-bills and unit trusts. These are speculative accounts that could create value in future.
Do your research to understand the trend on which areas people are moving to, then dip your toe into the pool.
6.   Ignoring government initiatives
Whatever the Government is offering, it is prudent to tap into it. Utilise government schools as opposed to private schools, or use NHIF for your healthcare or use the housing initiative to save.
 Maina also recommends that one aligns their business as well, with any government initiatives.
“I know a businessman who tapped into the SGR construction to get a contract to drill boreholes for water used in the construction. He raked in billions and even expanded his business. Pay attention to what the government is doing and place yourself strategically to reap the benefits.”  


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Dr PesaRed FlagsMoneyJobsRetirementPersonal finance

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